You are starved for current NASA TVimages of your favorite space mission, and are on the road with no TV set or Internet access handy, but you have a mobile phone with a data plan. What can you do? Bookmark these links:

NASA TV latest still (small)

NASA TV latest still (medium)

 

NASA TV latest still (large)

The NASA – KSC Video Feeds web page provides automatically updated still images of live TV streams and cameras from various sources such as NASA TV, the KSC Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), Shuttle launch complex LC-39A, and more. Some space-related web sites embed these images in their layouts. The above URLs directly link to NASA TV stills of the NASA Public channel in 3 different sizes:

NASA TV small: 147×99 pixels (5 KB)
NASA TV medium: 240×163 pixels (10 KB)
NASA TV large: 704×480 pixels (30 KB)

When you need the latest NASA TV still, just visit with your mobile browser the one that best matches your display size, connection speed and data plan. To get a later still, run the browser’s reload command. The minimum refresh time of the NASA – KSC Video Feeds page is 45 seconds, so it is not necessary to reload more frequently than once every 1 minute or so. This should work on most smartphones, mobile phones or PDAs.

You may also save the NASA TV images or even post them to Twitter via Twitpic. Note that, when provided with a direct link to a JPG image, some browsers try to download the file rather than displaying it.

You can get stills from more video feeds by checking the corresponding channel number on the KSC site. The general URL format is:

http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/countdown/video/chan[Channel-Number][Image-Size].jpg

To get the Shuttle LC-39A image on channel number 4 at medium size, for example, visit this URL:

http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/countdown/video/chan4medium.jpg

This is not the real thing and you don’t get audio, but it is a bandwidth-savvy way of accessing NASA TV and other useful space video streams. When you are on the go, this may be enough to complement the rich information and news on space events from Twitter and provide enough context.

Are there other ways of displaying NASA TV images on mobile phones or smartphones? What are your favorite tips?